EP Session 3 – Hope Ward-Brown

The first element of New Perspectives’ ‘Emerging Perspectives’ company that excited me was the opportunity to draw on the experience of industry professionals and other emerging artists to challenge and further my own learning. Our last EP session exactly fulfilled this.script work

We began with a session with Jack McNamara, Artistic Director of New Perspectives. Despite this being the third EP Company session, being thrown into exercises and workshops has meant we know very little about each others backgrounds, only having time to ask “so what do you actually do?” gabbled between cups of tea and Tupperware lunches. Our session with Jack began with finding out about each other in the company; 6 performers, a producer, a musician and myself labelled ‘director’ (although that label must be applied very loosely at such an early stage in my own journey). We sound as if we’re about to board the ark. Jack also spoke to us about about a method he had learned early in his directing career from Katie Mitchell, and the 7 steps to take when approaching a scene. These 7 steps help to ground the piece in place, circumstance, change and characters before a company begins working more deeply in the text. Jack then spoke about the journey that New Perspectives has taken; emerging (no pun intended) from humble beginnings as a powerfully political and controversial theatre in education company in 1972, back in a generation when theatre in education had a political outcry, and spoke more of humanity than road safety. In recent times, as Jack took the helm of the company, he steered New Perspectives to produce “exciting challenging and engaging” work. And that’s what they were doing, literally under our feet.

Whilst we had been discussing the whistle-stop tour of New Perspectives over the last few decades, their latest production of Unforgettable by Tim Elgood was in rehearsal downstairs. Unforgettable tells the story of a brother and sister over their lifetimes, as they battle with the demands of caring for an ageing parent with dementia. We all piled into the rehearsal room to watch a working rehearsal with actors Lennox Greaves, Anna Lindup, Hayley Doherty and Adam Donaldson, directed by Theresa

Director Theresa Keogh works with Lennox Greaves and Anna Lindup in the rehearsal room.

Director Theresa Keogh works with Lennox Greaves and Anna Lindup in the rehearsal room.

Keogh. Aside from a handful of comments and questions from Theresa and the company, you could hardly tell they were mid-rehearsal. It was evident to us that the cast had clear foundations in character and circumstance to enable ownership of the text. This is all aided by Tim Elgood’s wonderfully fluid and conversational dialogue. As an aspiring director, I’m adapting and learning how to watch theatre with an eye of criticism and creativity. With this in mind, I considered how this could be a challenging piece in terms of structure within the scenes, being very dialogue-heavy and within the same setting. But Lennox and Anna moved effortlessly around the stage with natural ease and pace. I’m excited to see the finished production at Derby Guildhall and see its progression in our week of absence. After the open rehearsal we had a Q&A with writer Tim Elgood. It became evident that the ease of language I spoke of was a result of Tim basing Unforgettable on his own experience caring for his mother-in-law. He spoke about not wanting to make it an issue-based piece of theatre, despite its inherent topic being a highly topical issue. Rather, he wanted the piece to be fundamentally about the relationships between the siblings and the effects the ‘issue’ had upon them. This reminded me of the time we’d spent with Jack earlier in the day, discussing New Perspectives’ roots in theatre in education. I considered whether theatre is always issue-based, by its very nature? And is it purely the way in which we tell the story that differentiates the style? We finished the day taking an extract of Unforgettable and working out how we would approach the scene. I was astounded as to how quickly the piecHopee leapt off the page; thus is the strength of the text. Even on first reading the text feels human. We made quick decisions using the system that Jack had explained to us earlier, to put it into practice. The more action choices and decisions made by myself alongside the actors, the more strength and power the piece had. Making choices made the scene easier to read from the eyes of the audience. I look forward to being the eager-eyed audience when the plays goes into production.

To keep up to date with the Emerging Company you can follow me on Twitter @hopewardbrown.

Hope Ward-Brown

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